Helping Kids with Autism Learn, Play and Thrive with Meg Proctor


Episode Summary

Many kids with autism have significantly delayed play skills, as well as they have difficulty learning new skills and expanding upon the skills they already have. More often than not therapists find themselves trying to teach children with autism how to play through imitation, but these children often have major difficulty with the imitation of others. Combine that with poor engagement and visual regard for others and learning to play for a child with autism can be daunting task. In this episode, we bring on Meg Proctor MS, OTL/R who is an expert in working with children with autism and who loves teaching therapists strategies to put in their tool belt. Meg and Sarah chat about all things autism and play.

Show Notes

Meg and Sarah discuss:

  • Common misconceptions about autism
  • Looking at the broader picture of children with autism
  • Utilizing the right tools for each individual child
  • Importance of evaluation and re-evaluation
  • Meg’s journey into specializing in autism
  • Finding the right mentor who aligns with your purpose and values
  • Working in early intervention and how that shaped Meg’s current work
  • Common questions from other therapists about autism and play
  • Selecting the right goals for working on play skills with children with autism
  • Identifying play skill goals versus social play goals and when to use them
  • Using simple activities to increase generalization from during therapy to the child’s daily routine
  • Utilizing a balance between using resources within the client’s homes and bringing a therapy bag
  • Use of naturalistic strategies to get them to start imitating
  • Scaffolding up or down to adjust the strategies to teach them skills, especially when they are rigid
  • How to structure you sessions
  • Meg’s company Learn Play Thrive

Contact her:

http://www.learnplaythrive.com

Coupon Code for OT 4 Lyfe Listeners: OT4Lyfe25

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/OTandAutism/

Email: meg@learnplaythrive.com

Double Timing Documentation with Jason Gonzales


Episode Summary

Documentation. It is something that all therapists are faced with and unfortunately, it is something that tends to take up a lot of our time. While some of it is very important stuff that we need to include, there are other parts of documentation that are just time sucks. It is commonplace that most reports take between 2-3 hours (or more) to write and that is outside of completing the necessary observations, interviews, standardized tests, scoring and interpreting results, etc. Jason Gonzales OTR/L, the Co-Founder and CEO of Double Time Docs comes on the show today to share how his experience within a variety of school districts, led him to creating a product to help therapist write reports efficiently and easily.

Show Notes

Jason and Sarah discuss:

  • Concepts such as efficiency, time management, prioritization, and redundancy
  • Learning in different ways
  • Lack of consistency in school-based reports
  • Common problems and complaints when writing reports
  • His personal experience and OT journey
  • How he identifies problems and then does something about it
  • What led him to develop Double Tim Docs and what it is
  • Tips for therapists to improve their own documentation process

You can find out more about Double Time Docs here: www.doubletimedocs.com

You can contact Jason here:

Project: Sensory with Rachel Harrington and Jessica Hill


Episode Summary

Sensory processing is a complex entity with lots of intricacies and is often times overlooked and misunderstood. As occupational therapists, it is our job to uncover underlying sensory processing and sensory modulation problems within our clients and then educate and provide tips and strategies to help them learn to integrate the information for success and optimal function within their daily lives. Rachel Harrington, COTA/L, AC and Jessica Hill, COTA/L come on the show to cover a broad overview of what sensory processing is, what it looks like, and some of their favorite activities to address sensory concerns.

Show Notes

Sensory processing is a complex entity with lots of intricacies and is often times overlooked and misunderstood. As occupational therapists, it is our job to uncover underlying sensory processing and sensory modulation problems within our clients and then educate and provide tips and strategies to help them learn to integrate the information for success and optimal function within their daily lives. Rachel Harrington, COTA/L, AC and Jessica Hill, COTA/L come on the show to cover a broad overview of what sensory processing is, what it looks like, and some of their favorite activities to address sensory concerns.

Sarah, Rachel, and Jessica discuss:

  • Common misconceptions of sensory processing
  • What sensory processing and sensory integration is
  • An overview of the sensory systems
  • The fine line between typical sensory functioning and dysfunction
  • How they got into and interested in sensory integration
  • What the Sensory Project is and how it started

Their favorite sensory activities and equipment: The Hammock Swing

Sensory resources for therapists:

Find them: