Project: Sensory with Rachel Harrington and Jessica Hill


Episode Summary

Sensory processing is a complex entity with lots of intricacies and is often times overlooked and misunderstood. As occupational therapists, it is our job to uncover underlying sensory processing and sensory modulation problems within our clients and then educate and provide tips and strategies to help them learn to integrate the information for success and optimal function within their daily lives. Rachel Harrington, COTA/L, AC and Jessica Hill, COTA/L come on the show to cover a broad overview of what sensory processing is, what it looks like, and some of their favorite activities to address sensory concerns.

Show Notes

Sensory processing is a complex entity with lots of intricacies and is often times overlooked and misunderstood. As occupational therapists, it is our job to uncover underlying sensory processing and sensory modulation problems within our clients and then educate and provide tips and strategies to help them learn to integrate the information for success and optimal function within their daily lives. Rachel Harrington, COTA/L, AC and Jessica Hill, COTA/L come on the show to cover a broad overview of what sensory processing is, what it looks like, and some of their favorite activities to address sensory concerns.

Sarah, Rachel, and Jessica discuss:

  • Common misconceptions of sensory processing
  • What sensory processing and sensory integration is
  • An overview of the sensory systems
  • The fine line between typical sensory functioning and dysfunction
  • How they got into and interested in sensory integration
  • What the Sensory Project is and how it started

Their favorite sensory activities and equipment: The Hammock Swing

Sensory resources for therapists:

Find them:

The Business Side of Occupational Therapy with Brandon Seigel


Episode Summary

Understanding the business side of occupational therapy is pivotal for any therapist and practice owner to know. In order to be successful within our profession, we must be aware of the state of healthcare and be solid within our purpose as a clinician.  Our guest today, Brandon Seigel, is a private practice business consultant and executive director of Wellness Works Management Partners with years of experience helping practitioners start, run, and advance their practices to the next level.

Brandon recently published a book called The Private Practice Survival Guide, outlining highly useful information for therapists and practice owners alike.  He presents all over the country at local and state conferences and has an online course and private practice podcast launching soon. His goal is to help therapists in creating a business model that ultimately helps them excel both on a business side and on a clinical side.

Show Notes

Brandon and Sarah discuss:

  • Brandon’s current professional life
  • Wellness Work Management Partners- Consulting Firm
  • Works with private practices all over the country and internationally (OT, PT, SLP & physician)
  • Consultation services and management services
  • Executive Director at Every Child Achieves in Southern California
  • Speaking all over the country, including 3 courses at American Occupational Therapy Association
  • New book just released called The Private Practice Survival Guide
  • Creating a new private practice podcast
  • Importance of prioritization
  • Why he does what he does
  • His start business and then how occupational therapy came into play
  • Struggles in school as a child and how that played a role in his desire to help others
  • Going to community college, then the University of Southern California, and graduating from California State University Northridge
  • Starting the workforce after college with entrepreneurs and managing other companies and multimillion dollar projects
  • His company was moving to a different state as he was marrying an occupational therapist whose mother had a successful therapy practice which needed some business support
  • Revolutionized that company and then branched out to start his own consulting company
  • Always felt a calling to purpose
  • His willingness to help his clients at any time and any day
  • How Brandon and Sarah met
  • Power of clinical integrity
  • Our current state of healthcare
  • The most asked question that he gets from private practice owners
  • Recognizing a therapist’s cost to a company
  • Shifting the employee mindset
  • Knowing the responsibilities of the employer and of the employees
  • Tips for therapists to stand out when being considered for a job
  • Resume building strategies
  • Importance of writing a cover letter and quickly responding to any correspondence for a job that you apply for
  • Self-awareness and his biggest perceived weakness is something that is not self-aware
  • Be specific in your skills and attributes
  • Discussing financials upfront
  • How to cut ties with an employee?
  • Upcoming online course coming in 2019

Find his book here: The Private Practice Survival Guide

Contact Him:

Email: brandon@wellnessworksmp.com

Web: http://www.wellnessworksmp.com

Twitter: @wellnessworksmp

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wellnessworksmp

Exploring the Country Through Travel Therapy with Emily Ann Becker


Episode Summary

Travel therapy is a unique practice area that consists of traveling to different parts of the United States in order to provide therapy services to places in need. Usually, rotations last about 13 weeks and then the therapist moves on to another placement. Sometimes there can be a potential to sign on for additional time if the services continue to be needed. Emily Ann Becker, OTR/L, is a travel occupational therapist who is currently licensed in 6 states and works in a variety of different settings, including skilled nursing facilities and home health. She discusses the best and worst parts of working in travel therapy and how flexibility is essential. Throughout our discussion she sheds light on the complexities and opportunities that being a travel therapist provides, as well as her passion for helping to inspire others.

Show Notes

Travel therapy is a unique practice area that consists of traveling to different parts of the United States in order to provide therapy services to places in need. Usually, rotations last about 13 weeks and then the therapist moves on to another placement. Sometimes there can be a potential to sign on for additional time if the services continue to be needed. Emily Ann Becker, OTR/L, is a travel occupational therapist who is currently licensed in 6 states and works in a variety of different settings, including skilled nursing facilities and home health. She discusses the best and worst parts of working in travel therapy and how flexibility is essential. Throughout our discussion she sheds light on the complexities and opportunities that being a travel therapist provides, as well as her passion for helping to inspire others.

Emily and Sarah discuss:

  • Being licensed in multiple states and the differences in state law.
  • The trials and tribulations of being a travel OT
  • The variety of settings that travel therapy provides
  • The ability to specify the new jobs you are presented
  • The best and worst parts of being a travel therapist
  • How much the placement companies help you with your placements
  • The personality that you need to be a travel therapist
  • The importance of self-care
  • Tips to becoming a travel OT
  • Tax implications of travel OT placements
  • Possibilities of international travel therapy
  • Choosing one word as a focus for the year

Email: ebecker815@gmail.com

Instagram: @emilyann815